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A photo of a White-Breasted Nuthatch clinging to a tree trunk. This photo was taken by Bailey Hendry at [Location] on [Date].
Photo: Bailey Hendry, Species: White-breasted Nuthatch

Our Values

Inclusivity

At the UM Indigenous Birding Club, inclusivity is at the heart of our mission. We strive to create a safe and welcoming space where individuals from all backgrounds can feel comfortable in outdoor environments and engage in the joy of birding. We firmly believe that birding is an activity that should be accessible to everyone. To ensure the inclusivity of our activities, we rely on various documents and resources, including those provided by Birdability. By utilizing these valuable resources, we aim to foster an environment where diversity is celebrated, and all individuals can fully participate and appreciate birding and connecting with nature.

Links:

Birdability

Birding Ethics

The UM Indigenous Birding Club is committed to upholding the Code of Birding Ethics outlined by Birds Studies Canada. Our foremost concern is the health and well-being of birds. We pledge to conduct our birding activities with utmost care and respect for their natural habitats, ensuring minimal disturbance to their daily routines. Through responsible birding practices, such as keeping a safe distance, avoiding unnecessary noise, and refraining from disturbing nests or breeding areas, we prioritize the preservation and protection of these remarkable beings.

Links:

Bird Studies Canada's Code of Birding Ethics

Respect

The UM Indigenous Birding Club is committed to respecting the land and acknowledges the original inhabitants and how they have been caretakers of this land, living sustainably on this land since time immemorial. We actively work to protect the environment and ensure the sustainability of our activities. The UM Indigenous Birding Club aims to promote responsible land stewardship and advocate for better practices that care for both the land and all its inhabitants.

The UM Indigenous Birding Club recognizes the importance of obtaining proper permission and consent when sharing Indigenous Knowledge. We are dedicated to seeking guidance from Indigenous communities and individuals before sharing any knowledge, stories, or teachings. It is our responsibility to acknowledge the source and provide appropriate credit to Indigenous Elders, Knowledge Keepers, Communities and guest speakers for their invaluable contributions. We understand that Indigenous Knowledge is a shared heritage that must be handled with utmost respect, integrity, and reciprocity. By upholding these principles, we aim to foster strong relationships built on trust and ensure the continued preservation and promotion of Indigenous Knowledge within our club and beyond. To guide our actions, we rely on established frameworks such as the Assembly of First Nations' First Nations Ethics Guide on Research and Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge, the Handbook of critical and Indigenous methodologies (N. K. Denzin, Y. S. Lincoln & L. T. Smith (Eds.)) , and the University of Manitoba's Working in Good Ways: a framework and resources for Indigenous community engagement. By integrating by using these documents as guides to our practices, we strive to uphold meaningful relationships and honor Indigenous Knowledge and protocols.

Links:

Assembly of First Nations' First Nations Ethics Guide on Research and Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge

Handbook of critical and Indigenous methodologies (2008, N. K. Denzin, Y. S. Lincoln & L. T. Smith (Eds.))
Working in Good Ways: a framework and resources for Indigenous community engagement

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